Green Eggs, No Ham

green eggs

Whisk 2 eggs, salt and pepper, and one teaspoon of spirulina powder (if you’re into that like I am; Chlorophyll and good bacteria = great detoxification and gut health).

Scramble in a pan. Add crumbled goats cheese.

Toss in one handful of baby spinach. Stir and cook with a firm hand until all is combined and well done.

Serve on a pretty plate, with a sprinkle of sunflower seeds and some slices of avocado.

DELICIOUS. This will keep me going for hours.

The Power of GREEN

Check out why Chlorophyll (the natural chemical found in all green plants) is so good for you. Below, I have quoted health guru Jason Vale. You can read the full article here.

“Concentrated Sunlight”

Chlorophyll has been described by many as ‘concentrated sunshine’ or ‘liquid sunshine’ and this is about as accurate a description as you can get. Chlorophyll is literally just that – the natural sunlight energy trapped within the fibres of the plant. When you separate the juice from the fibres you effectively release that liquid sunlight energy, liquid energy which improves the functioning of the heart, the vascular system, the intestines, the uterus and the lungs.

The same liquid energy which can help assist the body to clean the blood and liver, strengthen the immune system and reduce high blood pressure. Chlorophyll has strong anti-oxidant properties and it can act as a natural defence against free radicals, which are a damaging by-product of your metabolism. Free radicals encourage an acidic cell environment and contribute to all disease and the ageing process. The chlorophyll molecule itself is structurally very similar to the iron-carrying component of haemoglobin.

“Curry Con Carne”

The other day there was 200g of premium beef mince in our fridge that needed to be used. So I let my nose and intuition guide me and came up with this curried version of Chilli Con Carne.

curry con carne

My husband and I had already eaten, so I prepared the “curry” in under 20 minutes (it’s that easy), popped it in the fridge, and invited a dear friend to come and stay the following night so that we could reheat it and enjoy it together.

Because food is always better enjoyed and digested in fine company!

A few thoughts before we get down to business

Firstly, about meat portion sizes. The recommended daily intake of red meat for an adult is about 70 grams – much less than many people consume in one sitting. This recipe is great in that it combines meat with legumes for a lighter portion of meat per person, as well as “stretching” the meal out to feed more people. Another thing I like about the legumes in this recipe, called Black-Eyed Beans, is that they are deliciously al-dente and provide a lovely firm bite alongside the softer mince.

Secondly, about having a great supply of spices. If you want to be a great cook, spend the money on stoking up on a wide range of fragrant herbs and spices. Your cooking will benefit from the vast range of flavours that you can create, using natural, whole food ingredients, as long as you have a pantry full of little boxes of spicy goodness.

curry con carne two

A versatile dish

My dear friend Lucy and I enjoyed this meal simply, with grated carrot, zucchini, cheese, a dollop of sour cream, a squeeze of lemon, bound together with a fresh lettuce cup. This was a meal that was completely satisfying, with no grains, and full of wholesome vegetables. Fantastic for the body and mind!

My husband enjoyed the leftovers the next morning by reheating the Curry Con Carne in a pan, cracking in two eggs and covering the pan to allow the eggs to cook in the Curry mixture; reminiscent of the dish Shakshouka. Mr B served his meal on a bed of spinach with a squeeze of lemon. He wished there was enough for seconds!

Without further ado, here is this simple recipe:

Curry Con Carne

Ingredients

2t fenugreek seeds

1t coriander seeds

1t turmeric

1/4t ground ginger

1 large clove of garlic

1 onion, diced

1-2T coconut oil for frying

200g premium beef mince

1 can of organic black-eyed beans

Salt and pepper

Method

1. Over a medium-low heat, gently toast the fenugreek and coriander seeds until the seeds start to darken and become quite fragrant (about 3-4 minutes).

2. Add 1T coconut oil to the pan. Spoon in the turmeric and ginger and allow the spice mixture to cook to further release the aroma.

3. Add the diced onion, stirring occasionally while the onions become translucent, followed a few minutes later by the garlic. More oil may also be necessary at this point if mixture starts to stick to the pan.

4. Now add the mince, quickly breaking it up in the pan with a wooden spoon. Then allow the meat to cook for 5 -7 minutes largely undisturbed.

5. Finally, add the black-eyed beans and season liberally with salt and pepper.

6. Cook on a low heat for another 5 or so minutes, and then presto! It’s time to eat.

curry con carne recipe photo

Lamb Koftas with Eggs

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This is a satisfying, protein-filled brunch.

Lamb Koftas

Makes about 11.

400g premium lamb mince
1/2 onion, finely diced
1 egg
1.5 pieces middle bacon, rind cut off, finely diced
1t cumin ground cumin seeds
Salt and pepper, to taste
Coconut oil for frying

Put all ingredients into a bowl, and mix well using your hands.

To make the koftas, take about two tablespoons of the mixture and mould into oblong shapes. Fry in coconut oil on a medium-high heat.

Turn the koftas every 5-7 minutes so that they become well browned on all sides. When cooked through (about 20 minutes) remove from the pan. Serve immediately.

We enjoyed ours with mesculin leaves drizzled in olive oil and balsamic vinegar, sliced tomatoes and fried eggs. Hearty and healthy, this brunch will satisfy and energise for the day ahead!

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