Fresh Berry Coulis

coulis berries and honey

This is a great way of using up berries if they have become a little old and soft as they waited to be used in your morning bowl of yoghurt, fruit and nuts, but you kept deciding to have eggs and spinach for breakfast instead. Like I did.

In this easy recipe, the¬†berries’ natural sweetness is amplified by adding a couple of tablespoons of honey. The mint leaves lend a cooling freshness that enlivens the tastebuds.¬†Berries are absolutely brimming with phytonutrients and antioxidants, working to reduce inflammation in your body and also nourish and restore your cells to optimum health.

Use berries of your choice. Any mixture or ratio of varieties of berries will be delicious and health-edifying! Frozen berries are, of course, just as acceptable. I promise this coulis will give you and your loved ones a skip in your step and a smile on your face.

Fresh Berry Coulis

2 cups of berries of your choice

1 1/2 tablespoons of honey

5 or so medium mint leaves, torn

Combine all ingredients in a blender and serve with cakes, or ice-cream, or both!

 

Parmesan, Parsley and Pistachio Pesto

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This is an easy-breezy, beautiful, and flavoursome condiment. Use as part of an antipasto platter, to flavour a salad or sandwich, or in my recipe for Pesto Baked Chicken and Prosciutto. Recipe for that one later.

What’s more, this pesto is overflowing with goodness that will bless your health.

Each of the five simple ingredients – garlic, olive oil, parsley, pistachios, and parmesan – are powerful in their own way. Today I’ll share with you a bit about the first ingredient, as I use it in almost everything, and for good reason!

Garlic

The multifarious medicinal properties of this herb have been bragged about down the centuries. In medieval times, garlic was said to cure the common cold, the flu, and even the plague. Perhaps due to the strength of its odour, strings of aged garlic were strung around houses to ward off evil spirits, such was garlic’s perceived potency!

The two components of garlic worth mentioning are allicin and diallyl sulphides. Both compounds have antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. They have been used to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, to fight cancer and other degenerative diseases. They also function as antioxidants. There you go – so many reasons to flavour your food with garlic!

The digestion of allicin any diallyl sulphides are what lead to garlic breath, and can even cause a pungent skin odour for days after consumption. But don’t let that put you off! Read about garlic here.

Recipe

4 small-medium cloves garlic (use less if you’re not as much of a fan as I am)
3/4C extra-virgin cold-pressed olive oil
2.5C parsley, chopped
1.5C pistachios
3/4C parmesan, finely grated

Place all ingredients into food processor and blend until well combined. Add more or less olive oil to taste.